Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 95-

Periodontal status among patients with type II diabetes in a newly developing country


Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi 
 Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
P.O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq




How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Periodontal status among patients with type II diabetes in a newly developing country.J Interdiscip Dentistry 2019;9:95-95


How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Periodontal status among patients with type II diabetes in a newly developing country. J Interdiscip Dentistry [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Jan 18 ];9:95-95
Available from: http://www.jidonline.com/text.asp?2019/9/2/95/268378


Full Text



Sir,

In their interesting study, Zaiden et al.[1] estimated the prevalence of periodontal disease among patients with type II diabetes in Doha, Qatar. On employing the community periodontal index (CPI), they found that periodontitis was common (39%) among the studied population.[1] I assume that the following methodological limitation might cast some suspicions on the study results. It is obvious that CPI is an old assessment tool adopted by the World Health Organization to evaluate periodontal status. It was constructed more than two decades ago. It is an invasive technique, and if employed for screening of periodontal disorders, increases the cost of evaluation. Therefore, saliva test involving estimating hemoglobin (Hb) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) levels in the saliva has been developed. Evaluation of this new technique revealed that the sensitivity and specificity for Hb levels were 0.759 and 0.763, respectively, and for LD levels 0.722 and 0.711, respectively. Combining these two tests, when samples tested positive for both Hb and LD, the positive predictive value was 91.7%.[2] Being less invasive with accepted sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value, saliva test could be considered a viable alternative to CPI for periodontal screening.[2] I assume that if Zaiden et al.[1] employed saliva test in the study methodology instead of CPI, different results might be obtained. In spite of the aforementioned limitation, the increased tendency of diabetic patients to have periodontitis necessitates regular checking of periodontal status and considering implementing periodontal therapy as such therapy could contribute to better glycemic control in diabetic patients with periodontitis.[3]

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Conflicts of interest

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References

1Zaidan K, Alwadyaa A, Al Khuzaei D, Al Majed H, Al Lenjawi B, Mohamed H. Periodontal status among patients with type II diabetes in a newly developing country. J Interdiscip Dentistry 2018;8:81-6.
2Nomura Y, Okada A, Kakuta E, Gunji T, Kajiura S, Hanada N. Anew screening method for periodontitis: An alternative to the community periodontal index. BMC Oral Health 2016;16:64.
3Benrachadi L, Mohamed Saleh Z, Bouziane A. The impact of periodontal therapy on the diabetes control: A systematic review. Presse Med 2019;48:4-18.