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Table of Contents
EDITORIAL
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1

"Antibiotic Apocalypse:" A wakeup call for dental professionals


Editor in Chief, Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry, Professor and Associate Dean, Department of Periodontology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication10-Aug-2016

Correspondence Address:
Ashita Uppoor
Editor in Chief, Journal of Interdisciplinary Dentistry, Professor and Associate Dean, Department of Periodontology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal University, Mangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-5194.188152

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How to cite this article:
Uppoor A. "Antibiotic Apocalypse:" A wakeup call for dental professionals. J Interdiscip Dentistry 2016;6:1

How to cite this URL:
Uppoor A. "Antibiotic Apocalypse:" A wakeup call for dental professionals. J Interdiscip Dentistry [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Dec 14];6:1. Available from: http://www.jidonline.com/text.asp?2016/6/1/1/188152








There are different types of apocalypse being discussed these days, but it is the antibiotic apocalypse we health-care professionals should be concerned about. The US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention Threat Report (2013) warned that the human race is now in "the postantibiotic era" where infections will be harder to control, and formerly treatable diseases will then be potentially fatal. [1] Thus, the risk posed by antimicrobial resistance is a major issue the dental profession shares with the rest of the globe. A review of antibiotic-prescribing practices by dentists estimated that worldwide, dentists prescribed between 7% and 11% of all antibiotics, and there is evidence in the literature that it is often overprescribed. [2] This may be due to its proposed use in dental applications which is often empirical. In addition, habits and beliefs diehard, and there is considerable social and medicolegal pressure on dentists to prescribe antibiotics. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have demonstrated the prudent use of antimicrobials in medical care. It involves a variety of approaches and interventions to promote the use of antibiotics, antifungals, and antiviral therapies by reducing their overall prescriptions and to ensure effective appropriate usage when required. There is an international agreement that it is the responsibility of health-care services to implement programs to prevent and control the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms. This is a wakeup call for all dental professionals as antimicrobial stewardship competencies are disappointingly thin on references to oral health. Furthermore, not enough emphasis is placed on antimicrobial prescription and stewardship in dental educational degree programs. Strategies aimed at educating patients and reducing their demand for unnecessary antibiotics should be implemented in dentistry. Dental infections are biofilm-associated infections, wherein there are usually interventions that can be used as first-line treatments rather than the prescription of antibiotics. By choosing to adopt these various strategies, a sustainable reduction in antibiotic prescription in general dentistry can be achieved. This will definitely tone down our role toward this impending "antibiotic apocalypse" which may be expected in the near future.

 
   References Top

1.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States; 2013. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/threat-report-2013/index.html. [Last accessed on 2016 Jul 26].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Dar-Odeh NS, Abu-Hammad OA, Al-Omiri MK, Khraisat AS, Shehabi AA. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: A review. Ther Clin Risk Manag 2010;6:301-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    




 

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